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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 127 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 1:00am PDT
national security threats, warning their technology equipment could be used for spying. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. it's that time of year again, earnings season, we look at what wall street's expecting from third quarter results. >> tom: and speaking of seasons, it's already looking a lot like christmas for the nation's retailers. this year could be the best ever for online holiday shopping. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: two of china's top telecommunications companies are a threat to u.s. national security. that's the conclusion of the u.s. house intelligence committee after a year-long investigation into emerging technology giants z.t.e. and huawei. huawei says the report relies on rumors and speculation, and the company warns a trade battle could cost the jobs of thousands of workers in the united states. but, as darren gersh reports, there is growing bipartisan agreement that this is the right time to get tough on chinese cyber-theft. >> reporter: in unusually blunt language the bipartisan leadership of the house committee warned u.s. companies not to buy th
PBS
Oct 16, 2012 4:30pm PDT
used to be, and there are other components in the mix. my hope is this new c.e.o. and its team focus on what they have, avoid a lot of the noise going forward, and maybe coax investors back into the stock. because it has been a very difficult story. >> what about the stock? it was up sharply today. would you buy citi at $30 a share? >> yes. >> is this is turnaround story? >> no. i think it is a speculative story for the simple reason it hasn't been rewarding investors for the risk. you need a big dividend, and a bit more stability in the stock before you can recommend it to retail investor, compared to jp morgan. if you had to choose between the two, you would put them in morgan. >> do you have any disclosures to make, chris? do you own any of these bank stocks? >> no, i don't. i am a banker, but i don't have any personal holdings or any other management. >> great to have you on the show. chris whalen. >> he is author of "bull by the horns," about her front-row experience during the credit crash. she is back with us from our washington, d.c. bureau. sheila, you were and continue to b
PBS
Oct 18, 2012 4:30pm PDT
ago and $1.62 below estimates. yes, google's search engine continues to see more use, but the prices google charges for its core search advertisement product fell. the number of times visitors clicked on search ads was up 33%, but the prices advertisers paid for those clicks was down 15%. >> the inventory how it goes the more clicks there are going to be, the lower it will cost people at the end of the day. >> then there's google's newest division >> tom: then there's google's newest division, motorola mobility. in may, google spent $12.5 billion for motorola's cell phone business. while motorola added more than $2.5 billion in sales in its first full quarter with google, the division still lost money, more than a half-billion dollars. because the news wasn't expected until after the close tonight, trading in google shares was halted for two and a half hours. it restarted with less than an hour before the closing bell, and the stock fell 8%, closing at a five-week low. james dix covers google as an analyst at wedbush morgan. james dix joins us at the nasdaq. i want to start wi
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 1:00am PDT
behind us. >> reporter: others, however, are more upbeat, saying the u.s. manufacturing sector is alive and well. they point to a growing number of american companies looking to bring back to the u.s. jobs lost to overseas. but, u.s. factories are actually suffering from a huge labor shortage. a recent study shows the manufacturing sector cannot find workers with the right skills to fill about 600,000 jobs. linda rigano of thomasnet.com says that's because manufacturing as a career choice needs a major makeover. >> if we view manufacturing as that dark, dirty place where people are just making um, they're making things, but it's dark and it's dirty and it's dank, and it's low paying, people won't want to go into that. instead if we talk about it as it really exists, manufacturing is an exciting place to be today. >> reporter: it may be exciting here in the u.s. but, in europe and china, manufacturing is losing steam. new reports show eurozone factories suffered their worst quarter in more than three years, while china's factory output contracted for the second straight month. suza
WETA
Oct 23, 2012 6:30pm EDT
non- essential assets. others are using the weak quarter as an opportunity to clean up their balance sheets. >> everything but the kitchen sink. you are going to take every write-down, every mark down, everything that you can. get it out of the way, so you look better in the following quarter. >> reporter: but hopes are fading for a strong finish to the year. of the companies that have provided earnings guidance for the fourth quarter, 22 have been negative and only two have been positive. >> companies are already warning us not to expect too much from them for the fourth quarter. we've received the most negative guidance since we started collecting this data in history. >> reporter: the weak global economy isn't just bad news for big multinational firms; it is forcing many to tighten their belts by limiting hiring and investment, and that's bad news for workers and investors alike. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> susie: so, is today's market sell-off the start of something bigger? alec young joins us with his thoughts. he's global equity strategist at s&p capital i.q. >> sus
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 7:00pm EDT
joins us from the cme group in chicago. professor, it's great to have you back on the program. was together right decision to close all trading for the past two days? >> i think so. exactly. we should not have closing on the exchanges when there's great uncertainly. that's the last thing investmentors want. so telling the public it will close in advance was the right decision. >> tom: you led during the 87 market crash, and electronic trading now accounts for a majority of trading volume. why not allow for the electronic trading only even if the physical building was closed? >> the electronic trading feeds off some of the physical trading. but most of it is electronic. you would not want the electronic trading to go down. that to me is the greatest wor neour markets today s. what's going to happen when those algorhythms kick in. you need to have people running the algorhythms. without people in the building, i think the electronic trading wouldn't have worked. >> tom: wasn't it a matter of regulators and administrators not being able to man or person the exchange in the trading ver
PBS
Oct 15, 2012 6:30pm PDT
u.s. >> reporter: spectrum is pretty simple. it's the radio waves use to transmit things like radio and television broadcasts, police communications and now wireless data. and demand for it exploding. an industry report shows by the end of last year, more than 111 million smartphones and similar devices were being used in the u.s. that's up 43% from the year before. telecom expert john mayo says demand for data grew by more than 300% last year. he says smartphones use around 40 times the spectrum of traditional cell phones. tablets use around 120 times the traditional amount. but space on the airwaves is limited and right now it's getting more and more crowded. >> rather than thinking of this as us running out of spectrum, the better way to think about this is that the demands for spectrum, the demands for more spectrum, will make it more and more scarce, and unfortunately, if it continues to get more and more scarce, it will put upward pressure on the pricing of wireless services. >> reporter: the federal government has introduced initiatives that would ease congestion in cyberspac
PBS
Oct 29, 2012 4:30pm PDT
sophisticated. companies use those to measure aggregation of losses and potential losses from a given event. >> reporter: damage from wind, falling trees, and rain coming through roofs is covered by standard insurance policies. but analysts fear much of the damage from sandy to homes and businesses is likely to come from storm surge flooding which isn't. the insurance information institute estimates roughly 300,000 homes in the northeast could be vulnerable to this type of event. but the institute is optimistic many homeowners have flood insurance. >> nothing sells flood coverage like a flood and when hurricane irene hit last year there was widespread flooding throughout the northeast and many people did go out and buy flood insurance policies after that. so as long as they kept that policy enforced they'll be protected in the event they have flooding or storm surge damage from hurricane sandy. many insurance companies say they have hundreds of adjusters waiting to assess damage after the storm. still analysts say it will take weeks if, not months to settle all claims. diane eastabrook, "n.
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 1:00am PDT
, joins us. >> tom: and why some american manufacturers think an economic slowdown could be on the way. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! it's only october, but at stores around the country, it's beginning to look a lot like christmas. the national retail federation is predicting a 4.1% gain in holiday sales. that would not be as good as last year, but still above the ten-year average. but as erika miller explains, there's greater uncertainty than usual in the forecasts. >> reporter: past the halloween decorations, the candy, and costumes, you will find the artificial trees, wreaths, and tinsel. stores like this kmart are displaying christmas merchandise early, hoping for a greater share of holiday spending. >> they are coming in and looking at the trees and getting the thought in their mind that christmas is coming, and start to think, "what can i start shopping for now?" >> reporter: but forecasters say it's more difficult than usual to predict consumer spending this holiday season. the big wild card is the presidential election. >> this is the most difficult year we've eve
PBS
Oct 11, 2012 7:00pm EDT
. sprint may have a savior-- it could use help and money from softbank. sprint has been struggling for seven years-- a disastrous merger with nextel, and an expensive tab to modernize its wireless network. but sprint insisted today its talks with softbank are in the early stages. "although there can be no assurances that these discussions will result in any transaction or on what terms any transaction may occur, such a transaction could involve a change of control of sprint." reportedly, softbank would invest nearly $13 billion for a majority stake in sprint. that could go a long way to help sprint compete with rivals at&t and verizon, and pay for its investment in mobile broadband provider clearwire. >> i think the one piece of the puzzle with sprint that was always a little worrisome was their investment in clearwire. so to the extent that helps bolster clearwire, could make sprint an even better investment, but we'll have to see how this encapsulates clearwire, if it does at all. >> susie: michael bowen of pacific crest securities has been following this closely and joins us now
PBS
Oct 12, 2012 4:30pm PDT
know, personal loans, what you can tell us about that? >> right. at least at these big companies we're not seeing the kind of growth outside a mortgage that we have seen in recent quarters. loan growth is pretty slow. and the truth is that as a lot of people know and most viewers know, today if you really don't need a loan, if you've got stellar credit, you can get a loan pretty easily. but for many other people it's stillery tough. but the net effect is that outside of mortgage, we're not seeing a lot of loan growth. >> so is this going to be the theme when we get a new batch of earnings next week? we have city reporting on monday, then bank of america on tuesday, also goldman saks and more gag stanley reporting on the investment banking side. what do you think we're going to hear from those companies? >> okay, so it's the inand yang of banking in the world of quantitative easing. on the one side this interest-rate environment is tough. the spread between deposits and loans narrowing. on the other hand there's pret good activity, housing is picking up, credit is getting better.
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 7:00pm PDT
: here's where the president gets that $5 trillion number he used again today. governor romney's plan to cut tax rates by 20% would add up to about $5 trillion over ten years, assuming no other changes. but governor romney is planning to make other changes by eliminating tax deductions worth about the same amount. but the president is accurate when he says governor romney is making many promises in his tax plan. romney says upper-income people will not get a net tax cut; middle-income people will not see their taxes go up; incentives for savings and investment won't be touched; the estate tax and alternative minimum tax will be eliminated-- all this while cutting tax rates and not changing the amount of money the federal government brings in. an analysis by the tax policy center shows governor romney will have to make some big tradeoffs. >> so, governor romney has made five promises. he can't keep them all. he is going to have to, at some point, abandon one of those promises. he cannot cut tax rates, cut taxes on the middle class, cut taxes on capital gains, and balance the budge
WETA
Oct 9, 2012 6:30pm EDT
share, and was up a few pennies after hours. we're happy to have with us now alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld. >> welcome back to nightly business report. baseed on how alcoa did in the third quarter, how do you think business will be for you for the rest of this year and going into 2013? >> well, it's a miktsed word out there. there's a lot of volatility. we see in the end markets that we confirm, the aluminum market is going to be about growth six percent. we took is down a notch from seven percent. as you just said, this is a decade where aluminum demand has doubled. there's high growth also here in the u.s. and we've seen that in the aerospace industry, very, very nice. we're seeing it in the u.s. automotive segment, very nice, and then there are on the other side -- i mean, coming down. we've seen the heavy truck segment coming down substantially, pretty much in the u.s., and building and constructions on the commercial building and construction side, there's still very little signs of life there. >> susie: you know wha, are your calculus telling you? we hear how businesses are
PBS
Oct 19, 2012 7:00pm PDT
be any mercy, which simply probably tells us in a broad sense that stocks are to a large extent almost priced to perfection. >> susie: corporate america may be down about its future prospects, but american consumers are beginning to feel more upbeat. consumer confidence is at its highest level in seven months. why the disconnect and should investors be concerned about these out of sync views? erika miller reports. >> reporter: for years now, corporate america has been thriving, while consumers have been struggling. but now it seems, the tables have turned. businesses are worrying, while regular americans are feeling more hopeful. first, the worry warts. since the start of earnings season, a host of companies have reported disappointing numbers, including general electric, mcdonalds, google, microsoft and alcoa. across the board, companies are getting slammed by a weak global economy, particularly in europe. >> we know that the european debt crisis is still highly impacting companies and, for the most part, there's really no sector that's been able to benefit from growth there ve
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 7:00pm EDT
knocked down the financial district. us stock markets resumed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. the new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, the head of the nyse's floor operations. he's has been working with the exchange's staff for four straight days, and he even slept in his office last night to make sure the big board would be up and running today. >> we and the rest of the market are in great shape. it's surprising, almost surprising how great shape not just us but the rest of the market is, given how much potential disruption there was. >> reporter: still the internet and cell phones were not working. many traders rely on their cell
WETA
Oct 17, 2012 6:30pm EDT
. >> susie: tell us a little more about the heating oil, because a lot of people are worry that it will abe colder winter and that it will cost more to heat their home. so with heating oil and natural gas, what can consumers expect? >> natural gas prices will tend to increase with increasing demand. but we're coming from very low price environment, if you look through history. in terms of disstill ats, the heating oil, we have very low inventories, and in part it's because a lot of disstill at are being exported from the united states to latin america where demand is growing far faster than that region can define heating oil. and as a consequence, inventories in the united states are low for this time of year. if we have a colder be normal winter, one should expect prices to rise. however i believe that the projections for weather for the united states this winter are around normal. but clearly an unexpected cold spell could lead to a price spike. >> susie: all right. we'll have to leave it there. s thnkafor coming on our prom. gareth lewis-davies. nk >> susie: the f.b.i. today arrested
PBS
Oct 5, 2012 4:30pm PDT
. >> susie: joining us now with more anaysis on that jobs report... mark zandi...chief economist at moody's analytics. great to see you, mark. tell us about this 7.8%. does this mark the turning point in the job market? >> well, susie toverstates the case. i don't think the job market improved that much in the month of september. but i do think the job market is improving. it's improving enough to bring down unemployment. we're moving in the right direction but not quite as quickly as the data today would suggest. >> susie: 114,000 new jobs i mean, it's nice people are getting jobs, but it's flota really robust number, is it? what is it telling us about the labor market? >> right. 114,000 is okay. but it isn't robust. i think, though, as you kind of take a step back, look at job gains over the past six months, over the past year, over the past couple of years, wee gettinjob growth of about 150,000 per month. that's okay. in a normal economy we'd be pretty happy with that, but in this economy, where we have a high rate of unemployment and we want to get that down, 150 k is not enough
WETA
Oct 12, 2012 6:30pm EDT
learned that lesson the hard way last christmas, when consumers used its stores as a showroom, touching and feeling gadgets, only to buy them online for less. so the retailer now hopes to beat the competition at its own game this holiday season, by matching the prices of its top online competitors like amazon and walmart.com. some analysts aren't convinced it'll help sales. >> i think it will help stem market share and sales declines, but i you know we're still expecting a year over year decline for the fourth quarter for them as the product cycle is difficult and competition is still going to be tough. >> reporter: best buy says it's still working on the details of its price matching policy, but there will be exceptions like blackout dates. that means no price matching on black friday or cyber monday. it's also publishing a list of the 20 online sellers it's willing to match, and it says it won't match bargain basement prices from third party retailers on ebay or amazon. >> susie: it's a time of fierce competition with each side spinning a story of why they are best for ameri
WETA
Oct 22, 2012 6:30pm EDT
"position yahoo for long term success". joining us now with more on those yahoo numbers, colin gillis, senior technology analyst at b.g.c. >> sokolin, where they were up why date on that analyst call this afternoon, what is he going to do, and dow buy into it? >> yeah, the wheels did not come off the bus on yahoo! and that was very encouraging for investors. this is a company that still is facing some significant challenges. revenue was flat. they're still struggling to find growth but she did paint the clear message that we all like about how she was going to turn around, focusing in on the opportunities on search, making sure she brings in employees and trying to chase after the mobile opportunities as well. >> you know, everybody talks about monetizing mobile. >> you know, listen, when su have the quantity of the users that yahoo! has that is its largest asset. you talk about north of 700 million worldwide, use yahoo! every month so yes, if you are building good products people will use it. >> so traded newspaper after-hours trading, would you buy yahoo! at $16? >> you know, we are
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 127 (some duplicates have been removed)